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Emergency supplies for your horse

 
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Lady Luck



Joined: 15 May 2008
Posts: 621
Location: Mo

PostPosted: Fri Mar 26, 2010 2:38 am    Post subject: Emergency supplies for your horse Reply with quote

ok guys, How about a list of emergency med supplies you carry in your trailor and also with you on the trail when you are going out in the back country?
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Sharon
Have horses, will trail ride!
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sunshine treat



Joined: 06 Feb 2008
Posts: 300

PostPosted: Fri Mar 26, 2010 10:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wine, coffee and chocolate!

Judy
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FtValleyPS



Joined: 05 Feb 2009
Posts: 164
Location: Southwest CO

PostPosted: Fri Mar 26, 2010 8:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have a couple of papers on backcountry equine first aid, here's one from part of a class I helped teach to Forest Service folks last May. The format looks a little weird because it's a Word document pasted here, but the basic text is here. Hope it helps.

Basic Backcountry Horse First Aid Kit
John Nelson - May 2009 - (FtValleyPS@aol.com)
General
While many equine first aid kits are available on the market, they can be pricey and are often too big for practical backcountry use. Following is a list of very basic items that may be carried in the backcountry for a day trips or maybe for an overnight trip; a larger kit would be warranted for longer stays out. The rationale here is that for a day trip or perhaps one night out you are likely not to be all that far from a trailhead and potential veterinary care. Of course, this is only a general rule of thumb, other circumstances would warrant more planning and kit components. The items mentioned are meant to fit in a pouch that would fit in a cantle bag or saddle bag. Remember to consider using both your human first aid kit and horse first aid kit, as some of the components of each may be used for cross purposes. Also, several things are factored in here that you would or could use in your first aid but that would not necessarily be in your horse first aid kit, e.g. a knife or combo-tool (i.e. Leatherman) to cut things, water from bottle or stream for washing dirt from wounds, your t-shirt or plastic sandwich bag for stopping blood flow, a pen in your pocket taken apart could substitute for a short piece of hose to keep a horse’s nostril open in case of snake bite, lead rope to use as a twitch, etc. – remember, your animal can only carry so much weight, don’t set him or her up for possible first aid need on down the trail simply by carrying too much stuff, unless you don’t weigh a lot and are riding a large animal.
Background
In a lot of ways equine first aid is similar to human first aid, it’s just that the scale of things can be larger when we’re dealing with the horse or mule. Remember that, unless you are a vet or someone with advanced training in equine medical treatment, with this matter we are simply trying to address first aid for the animal, similar to what you may be thinking about in regard to human injuries you may encounter in the backcountry on a day trip.
Reviewing a good horse first aid book is a good idea. There are several available; I like the pocket-sized “First Aid For Horses” by Dr. Eleanor Kellon, from which you can get an idea of what you may need to know for equine first aid in general. And remember that much of this is subjective – each person may have his or her own personal preferences in regard to equine first aid; also, you may want to consult your veterinarian for additional information, including if you need items prescribed for your kit.
Primary kit for one day trip or perhaps one overnight:
 1 roll of vet wrap
 2 large gauze or Telfa pads; sanitary napkins work great
 1 small container of wound disinfectant, e.g. Betadine, furacin dressing, etc.
 Maybe, MAYBE penicillin and butazoldin (“bute”), but this is very debatable for shorter trips
 25 feet of duct tape rolled into a small roll, e.g. for hoof injury or if a shoe is lost; don’t laugh
 2 pieces of baling twine for about a million things out on the trail, including tying your t-shirt around a large cut on a horse’s chest, or for mini-roping practice with pals during lunch
Items you may be thinking about that you might add to this list: more and different types of bandages and antibiotics, fly spray, alcohol wipes, electrolytes, zinc oxide, Benadryl tablets, scissors, forceps or long tweezers, blood stop powder , short pieces of garden hose for open nostrils in case of snake bite, cold pack, bottled saline, epinephrine, Banamine, mineral oil, curved needle and surgical thread, small plastic bowl, petroleum jelly, Epsom salts, thermometer, twitch, …….
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ladybugranchnm



Joined: 12 Jan 2010
Posts: 79
Location: Bloomfield, New Mexico

PostPosted: Fri Mar 26, 2010 8:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

sunshine treat wrote:
Wine, coffee and chocolate!

Judy


Ohhhh, I like it! Very Happy

As far as medical supplies, I've put together a big kit for the trailer and a small kit for the saddle, for both human and horse.

In the trailer:

Stethascope
Thermometer
Hoof Pick
Tube of Bute
Duct Tape
Scissors
Triple Antibiotic Ointment
Corona (a wound cream)
Saline Solution
Betadine
VetWrap
Square gauze pads
Rolls of gauze
Band-Aids, various sizes
Snake bite kit
Bee sting kit
Instant Ice Pack
Ace Bandage Wrap
Athletic Tape
Various OTC meds for pain relief (I just buy one of the small human first aid kits that includes this stuff)


On the saddle:

VetWrap
Roll of gauze
Triple Antibiotic Ointment
Athletic Tape
Hoof Pick
Scissors
Band-Aids
Prescription Meds (incase I get stuck out there overnight or something)
Snake Bite and Bee Sting Kits

That's what I can think of off the top of my head while I'm sitting at my desk at work, hehe.

I also carry a survival kit with me, in case we get lost, or stuck somewhere, etc.

Nicole
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FtValleyPS



Joined: 05 Feb 2009
Posts: 164
Location: Southwest CO

PostPosted: Fri Mar 26, 2010 8:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here's some information we print out on wallet-sized cards for folks ...

Equine First Aid (Kellon, 1990)
Think Human Safety First

Normal Vital Signs
Temperature: 98-100 Deg F
Heart Rate: 28-44 beats/min
Respiration: 8-16 breaths/min
Mucous Membranes Normal Pale Pink
Capillary Refill: 1.5-2 seconds
Gut Sounds Always Present
Lacerations & Trauma
Control hemorrhage with direct pressure
Flush contaminated wound w/clear water
Control swelling, apply cold, bandage
Monitor vital signs for shock: heart rate>65
Lameness
Look for heat, sensitivity, and swelling
Apply cold for 20-30 min
Minimize swelling, provide support bandage
If nothing apparent, check foot again
Colic
Mild to Moderate pain w/ good vital signs:
Walk 20 min, rest 20 min, walk 20 min, etc.
If no improvement, e.g. pain, gut sounds,
seek help. Severe, unrelenting pain or heart
rate >65/min – seek vet help immediately
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FtValleyPS



Joined: 05 Feb 2009
Posts: 164
Location: Southwest CO

PostPosted: Sat Mar 27, 2010 12:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

ladybugranchnm wrote:
sunshine treat wrote:
Wine, coffee and chocolate!

Judy


Ohhhh, I like it! Very Happy

As far as medical supplies, I've put together a big kit for the trailer and a small kit for the saddle, for both human and horse.

In the trailer:

Stethascope
Thermometer
Hoof Pick
Tube of Bute
Duct Tape
Scissors
Triple Antibiotic Ointment
Corona (a wound cream)
Saline Solution
Betadine
VetWrap
Square gauze pads
Rolls of gauze
Band-Aids, various sizes
Snake bite kit
Bee sting kit
Instant Ice Pack
Ace Bandage Wrap
Athletic Tape
Various OTC meds for pain relief (I just buy one of the small human first aid kits that includes this stuff)


On the saddle:

VetWrap
Roll of gauze
Triple Antibiotic Ointment
Athletic Tape
Hoof Pick
Scissors
Band-Aids
Prescription Meds (incase I get stuck out there overnight or something)
Snake Bite and Bee Sting Kits

That's what I can think of off the top of my head while I'm sitting at my desk at work, hehe.

I also carry a survival kit with me, in case we get lost, or stuck somewhere, etc.

Nicole


I like your first aid kit, Nicole!
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SarahR
Site Admin


Joined: 22 Dec 2007
Posts: 911
Location: Bayfield Colorado

PostPosted: Sat Mar 27, 2010 3:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

We always carry Banamine on packtrips and trailer camping trips. Check the expiration date and get a new tube if need be. We haven't had to use it for one of ours, yet, but have needed it a few times for friend's horses.

Another thing I am thinking of adding is a "Spot" device that will periodically email a friend/family member to let them know where we are. It can also contact emergency services if something bad were to happen. You just never know.

I always have a few of those cheap plastic rain ponchos that are in a box about the size of playing cards in my pack, a magnesium fire starter, and a few emergency blankets.
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www.fourcornerstrails.com
www.rosehorse.com
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ladybugranchnm



Joined: 12 Jan 2010
Posts: 79
Location: Bloomfield, New Mexico

PostPosted: Mon Mar 29, 2010 2:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks John. Smile

I like your idea for the wallet sized cards with vitals on it! I may print that out and laminate it, if that's okay with you (to use your information)?

I also like that book by Dr. Kellon, it is in my first aid kit in the trailer. Very Happy

I'm still refining my kits. I've done camping from my trailer for a few years, with just short day rides, but this year I want to do longer, more remote riding, so this discussion is very timely for me!

Nicole
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FtValleyPS



Joined: 05 Feb 2009
Posts: 164
Location: Southwest CO

PostPosted: Mon Mar 29, 2010 3:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

ladybugranchnm wrote:
Thanks John. Smile

I like your idea for the wallet sized cards with vitals on it! I may print that out and laminate it, if that's okay with you (to use your information)?

I also like that book by Dr. Kellon, it is in my first aid kit in the trailer. Very Happy

I'm still refining my kits. I've done camping from my trailer for a few years, with just short day rides, but this year I want to do longer, more remote riding, so this discussion is very timely for me!

Nicole


Nicole, absolutely! When I posted this last week I noticed there are a couple of typos in it you can clean up pretty easily. Also, in the version I made into wallet-sized cards the headings (like 'Colic') were italicized for grouping subjects.
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