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Horse Camping

 
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Hossman38



Joined: 14 Mar 2008
Posts: 30
Location: Lebanon, TN

PostPosted: Mon Mar 24, 2008 7:14 pm    Post subject: Horse Camping Reply with quote

All of my camping has taken place in campgrounds with hookups. My horse trailer is a self-converted 2 horse slant load. When I bought it a few years ago, the "living quarters" was empty.

Since then, I have added a queen size mattress, a small fridge, a/c, bunk/bench on the lower lever and plenty of storage cabinets. Of course, I wired it for 110 with plenty of lights and plugs. We go to places like Bucksnort, Circle E, Buffalo and Birdsong that not only have electric campsites, but also have a dining hall for 3 meals a day. This is only for the organized rides, that they have several of each year.

Other places, such as Land Between the Lakes and several of the camps in Big South Fork have hookups, but don't provide food. You can either bring your own food or go to nearby restaurants.

That is the style horse camping that I am used to. I would not know how to begin to camp as you folks do, out West for instance.

Could you share with us "non-real campers" the logistics of camping this way. What kind of food (have you noticed that food is a high prioity item for me) do you take and how do you keep it fresh for several days? There has been discussions on here about attending to your horses, such as picket lines and temporary fenches. I would like to know just how involved it is to primitive camp for a week in Colorado and other places out West.
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SarahR
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Joined: 22 Dec 2007
Posts: 911
Location: Bayfield Colorado

PostPosted: Mon Mar 24, 2008 9:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here's what I posted in another thread regarding food:

"We usally bring steaks or chops for the first night, along with some veggies and bake potatoes in foil. Bring a whole roll of foil, as you can use it to cook lots of stuff (veggie packets, trout, etc). We also precook meal and freeze them in serving size ziplock bags that you can reheat by immersing the bag in boiling water. Like chili, soups, stew, etc. Sometimes I do spaghetti and meatballs by premaking the meatballs, freezing them, bringing spaghetti sauce in plastic bottles. Anything that is liquid is heavy to bring, though. Our friends bring a few dozen eggs those red plastic egg containers. Instant oatmeal, salami, cheese, crackers, stuff to go with trout, boil in bag rice....it's all stuff we bring. We take a few of those smaller fabric coolers and keep all the frozen stuff together in the shade. We've kept food this way for 5-6 days. You can wrap it in newspaper to help keep it this long. You can also immerse food in cold mountain creeks. "

I'd like to add that a few cans of tuna and a box or two of Tuna Helper can be dinner on nights 7-8 or whenever your real food is gone. I always tease people and say I'm bringing a box of "Marmot Helper"...he he!


We hobble our horses to graze, and highline at night. We've never had a problem w/ highlining, but others may prefer a single leg picket stake or electric fence.

We also have a LQ trailer, and I prefer that as it is so much easier. BUT I wouldn't trade my pack trip memories for anything!
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Hossman38



Joined: 14 Mar 2008
Posts: 30
Location: Lebanon, TN

PostPosted: Tue Mar 25, 2008 1:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

What, Shocked Shocked Shocked no dutch oven biscuits?
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jrw



Joined: 04 Jan 2008
Posts: 104
Location: Largo Canyon, NM

PostPosted: Tue Mar 25, 2008 3:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

In the west at the lower elevations, water is always your first priority. Sometimes you have to haul it with you.

To my way of thinking, what you eat depends entirely on how much time someone wants to spend in camp cooking. If I am on my own, my choice will usually be to open a can of something, eat a raw potato or what ever. I just can't bother with it..... but I like to cook for other people so the equation totally changes when you add people.

We rent our place out during hunting seasons and so have a lot of outfitters come through with their standard fares. let's just say it is not a heart-healthy menu plan! They typically do two square meals and a sandwich lunch. They use the same plan when they are tenting it. But they have a hired cook to keep things on the fire.

What I would recommend is taking your favorite Auntie along, providing she is a good cook, to maintain camp and cook. Actually a couple of Aunties, a couple of lawnchairs, and a case of beer, you'll be in chowhound heaven. At least in theory.

Yrs,
JRW (Patricia) Wink
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Painted Horse



Joined: 28 Jan 2008
Posts: 690
Location: Northern Utah

PostPosted: Tue Mar 25, 2008 4:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It just depends on whether I brought the wife or my buddies.

If we do not bring a trailer with a LQ, I have a propane stove we set up outside usually under an awing. We cook a steak, pork chop, fillet of Salmon or fresh caught trout. cut up a couple of baked potatos and fry them, warm up a can of beans, corn other vegie. Later in the summer, I start bringing Onions and Yellow Crookneck squash or what ever else I can pick in the garden. Cook those up in lots of butter. Cook some kind of meat and add a salad. for breakfast we will cook 1lb sausage in the dutch oven, When it's cooked we stir in a bag of Hash brown potatoes, then add dozen eggs. Stir it up good and add some cheese. When the cheese melts we serve it with some tortillas and Pico.

We've often been seen cooking hot dogs out of our saddle bags for our lunch on the trail. But here is a picture of some Natural food friends who brought pita bread and sprouts, tomatoes and smoked salmon for lunch, OH and my daughter with a can of pringles!



If it's just me or a buddy hunting. Especially in the LQ, we turn on the generator and use the Microwave to heat up some Chilli or soup. ( Cream of Brocholli and dipped with some soft dinner rolls) I keep a George Foreman grill in the trailer, and I often will cook a pork chop, fillet of salmon or chicken breast. The salmon or chicken, I often slice up and lay over a salad. I'm a big salad fan. So I often bring a couple types of lettuce. Iceberg, Romain, Bib, Red or Green Curly Leaf. Chop up the lettuce, some green or yellow peppers, radish, tomato, maybe some onion, put the hot sliced meat on top and drizzle with a ceaser dressing.
For one or two people that's pretty fast and easy.

If the gang is all there, we will break out the dutch ovens. I've cooked an elk roast all day till the meat fell apart, added some BBQ sauce and made sloppy joes. Cheessy garlic potatos are always a hit. I often make a pasta salad, add some crunchy veggies, califlower, celery and marinate with Italian dressing. Eat what you want today and throw the rest in a gallon Zip lock bag and throw it in the cooler. Eat the rest tomorrow.

I've done a fair amount of stir fry's. Put a big griddle on the propane stove (if camped at the trailer) or over the camp fire if we packed in. Cut the meat up thin and brown it. Add sliced veggies like celery, peppers, carrots, zuchini or Yellow Crookneck, pour a little Thai sweet chili sauce just before you serve.

If we are at the truck, I either have a fridge in the LQ or a cooler in the truck bed to keep food cold or frozen. I've done week long float trips down the main fork of Salmon or Colorado river and still had Ice cream on the 4th day of the trip with everything being hauled in a river raft. If we pack in on the horses we freeze our meats before we leave and they will last for dinner the first night. Bring lots of hard veggies. Potatos, carrots, onions that will keep without refridgeration. We will cook the veggies up with some canned chicken to make a stew. Later in the week we start pulling out the powdered Soup and Chili mixes, Mix with river water from the purifier and bring to a good boil, Hard rolls will keep a few days and taste great dipped in a hearty soup.

The trick to packing on a horse is to stay light enough so you can get enough food to last the week. But I eat a whole lot better than most back packers with their freeze dried food. You also need to pack things that don't Squish. I mean banana's and peachs probably won't surivive the pack trip in. But Potatos ( either raw or baked before hand ) do just fine.

I place all my eggs in a rubbermaid bowl, layer it with sweet mix for my horses and put the lid on. The sweet mix protects the eggs from the bouncing of the pack saddle and if an egg breaks, the horses still eat the sweet mix. So we frequently have real eggs for breakfast. Buy a package of that Pre-Cooked bacon. It doesn't need to be refridgerated until it's opened. So bacon and eggs are doable, 10 miles from the truck 2-3 days into a pack trip.

I'll use the electricity from the generator if it's there, but I don't feel like I miss anything if I don't have it for a few days.
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SarahR
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Joined: 22 Dec 2007
Posts: 911
Location: Bayfield Colorado

PostPosted: Wed Mar 26, 2008 3:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I was referring to horse packing in my first post, but most of our camping in in our LQ trailer. We've taken that trailer plenty of places most LQ trailers don't (and shouldn't!) go. We've ripped out the wiring and smashed the sewer guards more times than can be counted. Todd finally rewired it so the wire is protected. He had welded up a serious metal guard for the clean outs, but all that really did was lower the clearance. Anyway, I'm digressing.

Usually in the LQ food is the same as home, so nothing new there. For trail food/lunches we often have cheese and crackers. Sometimes egg salad sandwiches.
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Painted Horse



Joined: 28 Jan 2008
Posts: 690
Location: Northern Utah

PostPosted: Thu Mar 27, 2008 3:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

That's my problem, In the last year, I've damaged my holding tanks or skid plates 3 times. The 1st time I damaged the skid plate, 2nd time I tore it off. 3rd time I cracked the clean out valve.

I called Logan coach and asked them about buying a replacement skid plate, they told me they had quit installing them on new trailers because it lowered the clearance. ( same conculsion you mention in your post)

So what to do. I am considering blocking my trailer axles to lift the trailer up a couple more inches. Bigger tire on the truck to help lift the front of the trailer. Or a combination of both.

My trailer currently has 16" step off for the horses out the back. Which doesn't seem to bother any of my horses. The front of my trailer box when hitched to the truck is 18" high. So a 2" lift on the axles would actually bring my trailer level. But I don't think that will help my septic system much as it's pretty close to the front any way. So unless I lift the front of the trailer, I don't gain much clearance for the sewer valve.

If I raise the trailer axles 2" and go a bigger tire on the truck, which would add 1-2" to the front of the trailer, I'd probably see a 2" increase in height for the sewer clean out, ( it currently has 10" of clearance from a level surface), that would give 12" of cleanance, but my horses would have a 18" step off. At what point does that become too much of a step for a horse backing out? And will 2" more clearance solve the problem?

All these expensive options in a year when the economy is bad and I'm wondering how to pay my bills. Let's see, I want to spend a thousand dollars put a bigger tire on my truck and get worse mpg when diesel is at an all time high. Uh Huh! Maybe, I'll just stay on the pavement and stop driving on bad roads this summer. Or maybe I should just sell the LQ and go back to a smaller GN with out the LQ. Easier to drag down bad roads, nothing hanging under the trailer to drag.
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SarahR
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Joined: 22 Dec 2007
Posts: 911
Location: Bayfield Colorado

PostPosted: Thu Mar 27, 2008 3:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

We have a Logan, too! My brother sells them, so we got a good deal. We checked out the options, too, and decided to rewire it so it could be drug over stuff with less damage. But, really, there isn't much clearance with the sewer clean outs and the trailer jack placed where they are. someone needs to make an off-road LQ trailer Smile
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mo qh trail rider



Joined: 12 Feb 2008
Posts: 560
Location: SW Missouri

PostPosted: Thu Mar 27, 2008 9:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hossman,

We like to eat good when we camp, too. About 3 yrs ago, we moved up to a LQ trailer that has a frig that runs on either electric or propane. It is a small frig, but you would be surprised how much you can stuff in the freezer compartment. Before that we camped primitive in the mountains without that luxury. If you get a couple of good ice chest and put frozen meat in one of them and drinks in the other, they will actually stay cold for several days depending on the temps outside and how often you open them. Use solid blocks of ice. They won't melt near as fast as ice cubes. We have tried the dry ice thing, but didn't really feel like it helped a whole lot. You can always have meals with canned meat at the end of the week. We like salmon patties. When out on the trail, we take things like smoked oysters, canned cheese, Vienna sausages, etc.

We would prefer to camp with hook ups, too, but then again, we like to camp in the mountains where that is not an option. For the past few years, we have been taking a 2 week trip and going to CO, WY, NM, etc and camping primitive. We like to ride in wilderness areas and we set up a base camp near the border of those areas. We always just do day rides and return to camp every afternoon. We camp in one spot for about a week and then move to another area, so we stock up on supplies in between the two weeks. Just something about a trip out west that draws you back.

We usually camp in FS campgrounds. This is a distant view of the campground at Jack's Creek near Pecos, NM.


This is the campground at Palisades near Pagosa Springs, CO.


Sometimes we set up a kitchen area behind the trailers.


Sometimes we put our awnings out side my side and use that as our kitchen.


As you can see, we are not really roughing it too bad and you can tell by our "kitchens" that food is pretty important to us, too.
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Boogie



Joined: 20 Jul 2008
Posts: 9
Location: Pine Mountain, GA

PostPosted: Tue Jul 22, 2008 1:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Where can I buy the rugs/mats that are shown on the ground under the awnings?
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ricco



Joined: 26 Jan 2008
Posts: 168
Location: Missouri

PostPosted: Tue Jul 22, 2008 6:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Boogie, I got mine off of ebay. Just type in rv mats and you should have plenty to choose from.
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Reindance



Joined: 10 Sep 2008
Posts: 20

PostPosted: Wed Sep 10, 2008 8:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Since I haul on my own, with one horse in a three horse trailer, with full LQ the trailer serves as a hay wagon, with a little corner for the horse. There is also a large generator that stays in the tack room (too heavey to mess with all the time) Luckily I can survive on small meals very small breakfast cereal and hardly anything for lunch boiled eggs cheese, when on the trail. Sometimes if the camping spot is in someones hayfield or bush lot, water must be brought for the horses, so one of the stalls has a 45 gal barrel full of water in it. I also carry water for myself since the water in the trailer is not all that drinkable, who knows how long it has been in the reservoir. I cook outside either on open fire, small BBQ or portable Propane stove. Salads and pasta are easy meals to prepare. I do enjoy a BBQ steak or porkchop, and no better time for that then when camping.
I also worry about the laneways into the camping spot some of those fields are pretty rough and rocky. Actually the one time that I tore off the pipes from the holding tank was in southern Ohio where the lanes were quite smooth and trailer friendly...it was backing in off the laneway that had quite a drop in it to the campsite...live and learn, I am much more careful now when settle into a campsite.
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LOVEDUFFY



Joined: 04 Apr 2008
Posts: 452
Location: new york

PostPosted: Fri Jul 18, 2014 4:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I know this is old but it help me Very Happy
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